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Connective tissue cells (granulation tissue of healing wound, HE) II

 

1. fibroblast, arrow points to the nucleolus

1. fibroblast, arrow points to the nucleolus

1. fibroblast, arrow points to the nucleolus

1. fibroblast, arrow points to the nucleolus

1. fibroblast, arrow points to the nucleolus

1. fibroblast, arrow points to the nucleolus

2. *plasma cell (*plasmacyte)

2. *plasma cell (*plasmacyte)

2. *plasma cell (*plasmacyte)

2. *plasma cell (*plasmacyte)

2. *plasma cell (*plasmacyte)

2. *plasma cell (*plasmacyte)

3. lymphocyte

3. lymphocyte

3. lymphocyte

3. lymphocyte

4. histiocyte

4. histiocyte

5. *eosinophilic granulocyte

5. *eosinophilic granulocyte

5. *eosinophilic granulocyte

5. *eosinophilic granulocyte

 
The crucial point in the recognition of the plasmacyte is that only this type of the connective tissue cell has an intensely stained cytoplasm (that's why it is called "plasma cell"). The other features: the looser "wheel-like" (or "clock-face") structure of the chromatin, the excentric position of the nucleus and the basophilic blue staining of the cytoplasm due to the accumulation of the cytoplasmic ribosomes, are morphological signs of the intense protein synthesis, but they are not always conspicuous, actually the cytoplasm can even be eosinophilic due to the accumulation of the synthesized proteins (immunglobulins). The plasma cells are also frequent in the intestinal villi (see Fig. [02.02], index 4), and in the connective tissue of the large salivary glands. The eosinophilic granulocytes, which increase in number around the healing wound, during inflammation and allergy, produce substances controling and decreasing the inflammation. This cell is actually an antagonist of the mast cell.
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